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Accurate Testing For Accurate Treatment
When it comes to any type of medical concern, the first and most crucial step is determining exactly what is going on. Without an accurate diagnosis, treatment will not be effective, and your quality of life will suffer. New York Facial Paralysis takes a comprehensive approach to determine why patients are experiencing certain symptoms. The importance of an accurate diagnosis is revealed when treatment plans work to correct and treat symptoms rather than mask their effects.

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome
Facial nerve disorders can cause weakness or paralysis on one or both sides of the face. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome is caused by a virus in the facial nerve. An infection of the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve from the herpes zoster virus causes this serious condition. Ramsay Hunt Syndrome is a more severe cause of facial paralysis, and it requires exceptional patient care.

Bulbar Palsy

Bulbar Palsy
Bulbar Palsy is a motor neuron lesion that affects the lower cranial nerves (9, 10, 11, 12). These nerves are responsible for the control of the movement of muscles that are used for chewing and swallowing, as well as movement of the head and neck. While often confused with Pseudobulbar Palsy because both of these diseases share common symptoms, Pseudobulbar Palsy is caused by damage to the upper motor neurons.
Treatment for Flaccid Paralysis
Flaccid paralysis is a neurological condition characterized by the weakness of the facial nerve that results in complete lack of movement in the face. Several conditions can cause damage to the facial nerve, and they can result in flaccid paralysis. Common symptoms of this facial paralysis include reduced muscle tone, an inability to contract the facial muscles (e.g., inability to close the eye or lift the corner of the mouth), inability to raise the eyebrow, inability to smile, speech impairment, as well as difficulty eating or drinking.

Bell's Palsy

Bell's Palsy
Bell’s Palsy is a type of facial paralysis that affects the ability to control the muscles on one side of the face. Most people (70%) who suffer from Bell’s Palsy are only affected temporarily and will fully recover from the condition within weeks to months. While there is no specific cause of Bell’s Palsy, it is mostly contributed to a viral reactivation in the facial nerve. Some people who suffer from a viral infection are left with the virus hibernating in the facial nerve nucleus.