Is Facial Paralysis a Concern?

Do you have symptoms that may point towards facial paralysis? Signs may include unusual tightness in the face, twitching, a noticeable droop, or facial anatomy that has become asymmetric. Determining what is causing these symptoms is the first important step towards finding relief.

You may be suffering from facial inflammation, infection, or an undiagnosed health condition. It is essential that you seek medical attention if any of the symptoms of facial paralysis persist. A basic medical history assessment and medical examination is the primary approach to diagnosis. However, further investigation is often needed for complex facial paralysis cases.

Facial Paralysis Diagnosis

There is an extensive list of diagnostic tools that are used to determine the cause of facial paralysis. Hearing and balance testing, electrical testing such as electromyography (EMG) and Electroneurography (ENOG), radiographic imaging, lab testing, and blood testing are most common.  

You may need to go through the full array of testing approaches. Every patient will present with a different set of symptoms. As such, you will receive care that is individualized to your circumstances. The primary goal at our New York Facial Paralysis offices is to quickly establish the cause of your symptoms and offer effective solutions. This cannot be achieved with a one-size-fits-all approach.

Facial Paralysis Treatment

We treat facial paralysis by establishing and targeting underlying causes. Our methodologies range from treating facial paralysis caused by viral infection to conditions stemming from nerve damage. At New York Facial Paralysis, our team will create a treatment plan designed to provide you with permanent relief from your symptoms.

To learn more about the symptoms and potential causes of facial paralysis, call our offices to book a consultation. We are here to offer you all the support that you need throughout your treatment journey. New York Facial Paralysis is committed to offering all patients the best path to recovery.

Posted on behalf of Dr. Teresa O, New York Facial Paralysis Center

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